All posts by SteamSpeed [Teryn]

SteamSpeed Focus RS Intercooler Upgrade: Final Design Approved!

We are excited to announce our final revision to our Focus RS intercooler! We’ve gone through three design revisions and this is the perfect design.

[Mounting & Fitment Improvements]

The first prototype core design showed huge efficiency gains vs the OEM unit; however, we saw room for improvement.  In the next two prototypes we iterated and improved the end tanks and mounting tabs to further increase the efficiency of the core and ease of install.

After the intercooler had been mounted and driven nearly 1000 miles of road conditions including freeway cruising, data log pulls, dyno time, and spirited drives, we found ways to improve its mounting to the chassis vs the OE.  In our final version, we increased the thickness of the mounting tab material from 3mm to 5mm and adding a perpendicular support to the lower tabs for greater strength and durability.  This insures a rigid mount to radiator chassis.  We also found that utilizing openings in the bumper frame to support the intercooler from the top was much more effective then the OE mounting points; the factory cooler is only suspended from the lower tabs and held vertical by the upper tabs that engage hooks into the casting of the cooler tanks.  Due to the increase in weight of our cooler we knew the lower supports would never be sufficient without the extra bracing.  To utilize the bumper frame, we installed a bolt and nut through the opening. This was fine for our final prototype but we look forward to using a plastic insert and screw to secure the upper mounts. This will ensure ease of installation with minimal effort.

Here you can see just how massive this thing is. There’s also a good view of the upper bumper frame mounts. This holds the weight nicely and gives great support for the cooler.

[Intercooler Performance Testing]

Our upgraded Focus RS intercooler, uses quite a bit more heat removing aluminum vs the OE unit.  It is about 30-40% larger by volume and more than 50% larger by mass and surface area vs the OE unit.   The performance of the intercooler core of our first prototype was stellar, so final prototype’s core remains the same.

Our Focus RS intercooler upgrade brings intake temps well below 100 degrees F.  It doesn’t get terribly hot here in Washington State but we did manage to have a day with an ambient temp of 80 degrees F and a resting 101.9 degrees F. You can see in the graph how the Charge Air Temp (white line) drops rapidly when the throttle body opens. And makes its way back down to 86.7 degrees F when grabbing 3rd gear.  That’s great!  Many tuners are happy with and consider an intercooler “good” if it can manage to get below 100.  The temp does start to climb as expected in the longer gears but as shown in the second graph the charge air temp only climbs 5 degrees to 92 degrees before lifting off the throttle.  In comparison, the OE core is much less efficient.  We’ve recorded increased charge temps of around 30 degrees F.  That means our upgraded Focus RS intercooler around 25 degrees (6x) cooler than the OE intercooler!

If you have any more questions please let us know! sales@steamspeed.com

[Testing Data]


Above is the data log of a 1st through 3rd and into 4th gear acceleration. The white line shows Charge Air Temp. The Charge Air Temp is around 100 degrees F when the throttle plate is closed.  The induction air is moving slowly and heat from the engine heats the air.  When the throttle plate opens is when the largest drop in Charge Air Temp occurs.  Lots of fresh air is let in and the heated induction air passes through quickly.  As the vehicle hits 3rd gear it is apparent the turbocharger is now working very hard. There is a slight increase in Charge Air Temp towards the end of 3rd gear. If this data was done without the cooler we would see.
Data log continued (same log as previous graph)

#ford #focus #rs #turbo #intercooler #prototype #presale #keepitcool #steamspeed

Installation Guide for EJ fitment Steam Speed Turbochargers.

We are proud to announce  a simple installation guide that can be used on all EJ fitment vehicle.  We kept most of the description as generic as possible and high lighted the key steps in replacing your turbo. As stated in the video there may be differences in your exact application.  Below the video is the full transcript of the narration.

Full Transcript

Welcome to the installation video for EJ fitment steam speed turbo chargers.

  • Today we will be installing a steam speed stx67r-10 twin scroll on our version 8 ej207. This process can be applied to any EJ fitment vehicle or to these listed part numbers.
  • SUB-STX63-8PSUB-STX67-8PSUB-STX67+8PSUB-STX71-8P

    SUB-STX71+10P

    SUB-STX76-8P

    SUB-STX76+10P

    SUB-STX67R+8

    SUB-STX71R-83

    SUB-STX76R-8

    SUB-STX67+LGT-8P

    SUB-STX71-LGT-8P

    SUB-STX63-TS-10

    SUB-STX67-TS-10

    SUB-STX67+TS-10

    SUB-STX71-TS-10

    SUB-STX76-TS-10

    SUB-STX67R+TS-10

    SUB-STX71R-TS-10

  • Notice our vehicle is far from stock and what you see in the video may not match your vehicle. However, the key points of the process will be the same.
  • We begin by gaining clear access to the turbo. We removed the air filter and Mass Air Flow sensor housing and charge pipe at the turbo.
  • If you have a top mount inter cooler remove that from the throttle body and compressor outlet.
  • The silicon or plastic hoses may be stuck. Use brake clean to break the adhesion and carefully work the sealing edge with a hose pick. Take caution not to puncture or tare the hoses as this will lead to a boost leak later.
  • Next remove any heat shielding you may have installed. Whether that’s a turbo blanket such as the steam speed titanium or carbon fiver turbo blankets or bolted on stamped steel heat shields.
  • Next use a rust penetrator such as “wd40”, or “pb blaster” and soak the turbine housing bolts on the up and down pipe flanges. Allow them to soak for at least 15 to 20 minutes.
  • While the bolts soak, place a collection pan underneath the vehicle directly below the turbo and remove the coolant and oil lines connected to the CHRA portion of the turbo.
  • I suggest using hose clamps to minimize the amount of spilled coolant and coolant unnecessarily draining from the engine.
  • I also cap the coolant lines on the turbo to also minimize the mess.
  • Next you can begin to loosen and remove all the up and down pipe flange bolts.
  • Caution, these bolts can break if too rusted together. If this happens you will need to replace them.
  • When the flange bolts and nuts are removed disconnect the down pipe from its solid mounts on the side of the transmission. Up plug any oxygen sensors and move the down pipe from the vehicle.
  • Once the down pipe is clear loosen the compressor inlet pipe and maneuver it toward the front of the vehicle underneath the intake manifold until it is clear of the compressor housing.
  • Then you should be able to lift the turbo off the up pipe flange and oil drain tube.
  • Take caution with the oil drain tube as the hoses can stick and tension clamps can lose their tension over time and fall off while removing. The open oil drain will be exposed and can risk material falling into it.
  • Place the new and old turbo chargers on a work bench and note any comparable differences that may cause fitment issue or parts that may need to be transferred such as coolant lines or the oil drain tube.
  • Next you will see there are 3 studs provided with your new turbo. Place these in the corresponding locations compared to your previously removed turbo. Then tighten these studs with a 7mm open end wrench.
  • Apply thread sealant or thread tape to the oil feed line fitting on the back side of the cylinder head. This will be a hard line on AVCS equipped engines.
  • Then install the oil feed line.
  • Prep the up and down pipe flanges for new gaskets, remove any surface rust or grease and oil with a fine grade abrasive pad. Then place your new up pipe gasket on the flange.
  • Place your new steam speed STX turbo charger on to your up pipe flange. Remain aware of the oil drain tube alignment. If the drain tube is new it may be more difficult to slide onto the metal portion connected to the CHRA (center housing rotation assembly). You can apply a thin film of engine oil to the rubber drain tube to ease its fitment on to the metal portion. Then Place the tension clamps back into place.
  • Carefully guide your turbo inlet pipe onto the inlet of the compressor housing. On larger turbo’s this may be more difficult as the compressor inlet diameter may be larger than the diameter of your inlet pipe. Tighten the clamp, securing it to the compressor housing.
  • Begin to reinstall all the nuts and bolts securing the turbo to the up pipe. Be sure all nuts and bolts are in place before tightening all the way. Place your down pipe gasket on to the outlet flange and studs on the turbine housing. And guide the down pipe into place.
  • Then install the down pipe flange nuts and bolts. Again do not tighten until all bolts are in place.
  • Torque all up and down pipe bolts to 26 ft/lbs
  • Next apply thread sealant or tread tape to the oil feed line fitting on the top side of the CHRA.
  • Reconnect the coolant hoses and vacuum lines.
  • Carefully check each step on the installation to be sure nothing was missed or any hoses moved out of place.
  • Reinstall the charge pipe and air filter housing.
  • The most important step is priming the oil system. If this step is not performed eruptible damage will be done to the CHRA.
  • Disable the ignition system but either removing the crank sensor signal.
  • Crank the vehicle over for a minimum of 30 seconds.
  • Re connect the ignition system and start the car.
  • Allow the vehicle to idle for 15 to 20 minutes and reach operating temp slowly. Do not rev the engine.
  • Inspect your work for coolant or oil leaks at the fittings and hoses.
  • Be observant for a hiss noise of possible vacuum or intake leaks.
  • Once the vehicle has been thoroughly checked, let it cool and reinstall your heat shielding.
  • It is now imperative your vehicle is tuned by a trusted tuner using a chassis dynamometer.

 

Dyno Testing: SteamSpeed STX 67 Turbo for Ford Focus RS Prototype

STX 67 Turbo for Focus RS Prototype Dyno’ed!

Have you been wondering what our stock turbo STX 67 upgrade could do, the Results are in!!!

For this unit, we started with an OEM unit and increased the compressor wheel around 3mm on the inducer and 4mm on the exducer.  The turbine section remained the same for this prototype.  It is not clear if the OEM turbine housing can support a larger turbine wheel; there is not much room in there.

Our N55 turbo with similar enhancements on the cold side, and is able to make about 60-70 whp more power than the stock unit + stage 2.  Lets see how our Focus RS prototype does.

We couldn’t be more pleased with the initial performance gains of our STX 67 prototype for the Ford Focus RS.  Our friends at English Racing in Camas, Washington helped us reached 345 WHP and 383 wft*lbs @ 22psi (recorded with map sensor).  That’s 55hp & 77 ft*lbs over the factory tune.

Mod List:
– Stock 2016 Focus RS
– SteamSpeed STX 67 turbo prototype
– SteamSpeed front mount intercooler kit prototype
– COBB AccessPORT
– 92 octane WA pump gas

Here are the dyno results from our car at English Racing.

Green: Baseline, Stock RS with Stock Tune – 92 octane
Red: Cobb Stage 1 Base Map – 92 octane
Blue: SteamSpeed STX 67 turbo + SteamSpeed FMIC

SteamSpeed STX 67 Turbo for Ford Focus RS Prototype
SteamSpeed Focus RS STX 67 Turbo Upgrade

What does our turbo look like vs a full “stage 2” car (FMIC, turbo-back, intake, etc.) on the same dyno?  There was still the same ~40 ft*lbs torque gains, and about 11 whp on top.

SteamSpeed Focus RS STX 67 Turbo vs Stg 2
SteamSpeed Focus RS STX 67 Turbo vs Stg 2

Some initial thoughts:

We saw some solid gains on our mostly stock car. It was in fact the most power and torque a Focus RS has put down at English Racing on pump gas.

Since we left the turbine section as is, we didn’t expect to see huge gains on the top-end that one could probably be achieved with a larger A/R turbine housing. Accordingly 11-33 whp gains on the top end are not huge, but still a significant improvement. 40 ft*lbs on the low end is a good result. That is something you’d feel daily driving. It is clear that Ford really wanted to optimize for low end torque with this design, so it may be a challenge to overcome that housing’s limitations without replacing it all together.

All in all, there were gains around 5-15% across the entire rev band, so we are pleased with the result. It really doesn’t lose any of the benefits of the stock unit in terms of responsiveness and so on while making solid gains everywhere vs the OEM unit. As is, it is a no-downside upgrade vs the stock unit.

E-mail support@steamspeed.com for Focus RS product inquires.

Next steps:

It would be interesting to see how this turbo would do with more bolt ons like a turbo back and upgraded intake.  Our car was mostly stock otherwise.  I think we see some modest gains.

The wastegate duty cycle was about maxed out, so that could improved with a different waste spring preload or changing out the boost controller.

I think we could make the compressor somewhat larger without overpowering the turbine section.  That might net another 10% more power.

Other notes:

And the car still got 28 average mpg on the way back.